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Bereavement

Mended Little Angels is a program of Mended Little Hearts (a program of The Mended Hearts, Inc), which is a special program offered to parents and family members who have lost a child or loved one to a congenital heart defect (CHD).

Mended Little Hearts realizes that your needs are special and unique. We invite you to join us in our CHD support group and events, and we also would like to extend an extra hand to you. In this program you can meet other families who are grieving too. You can share stories and support each other. You are not alone! Find a chapter here.

You can connect with other grieving families by email or connecting on Facebook.


Recommended Books and Readings

  • Carly Marie Project Heal - Practicing the art of self-care and mindfulness to heal your heart and inspire wholehearted living after the death of a baby or child.
* Mended Little Hearts does not endorse these books. They are recommendations from some of our Angel families.

The Mourner's Bill of Rights

By Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D.

  1. You have the right to experience your own unique grief.
    No one else will grieve in exactly the same way you do. So, when you turn to others for help, don’t allow them to tell you what you should or should not be feeling.

  2. You have the right to talk about your grief.
    Talking about your grief will help you heal. Seek out others who will allow you to talk as much as you want, as often as you want, about your grief. If at times you don’t feel like talking, you also have the right to be silent.

  3. You have the right to feel a multitude of emotions.
    Confusion, disorientation, fear, guilt, and relief are just a few of the emotions you might feel as part of your grief journey. Others may try to tell you that feeling angry, for example, is wrong. Don’t ‘take these judgmental responses to heart. Instead, find listeners who will accept your feelings without condition.

  4. You have the right to be tolerant of your physical and emotional limits.
    Your feelings of loss and sadness will probably leave you feeling fatigued. Respect what your body and mind are telling you. Get rest daily. Eat balanced meals. And don’t allow others to push you into doing things your don’t feel ready to do.

  5. You have the right to experience “griefbursts.”
    Sometimes, out of nowhere, a powerful surge of grief may overcome you. This can be frightening, but it is normal and natural. Find someone who understands and will let you talk it out.

  6. You have the right to make use of ritual.
    The funeral ritual does more than acknowledge the death of someone loved, it provides you with the support of caring people. More importantly, the funeral is a way for you to mourn. If others tell you the funeral or other healing rituals such as these are silly or unnecessary, don’t listen.

  7. You have the right to embrace your spirituality.
    If faith is part of your life, express it in ways that seem appropriate to you. Allow yourself to be around people who understand and support your religious beliefs. If you feel angry at God, find someone with who won’t be critical of your feelings of hurt and abandonment.

  8. You have the right to search for meaning.
    You may find yourself asking, ‘Why did he or she die? Why this way? Why now?” Some of your questions may have answers, but some may not. And watch out for the clichéd responses some people may give you. Comments like, “It was God’s will” or ‘Think of what you have to be thankful for” are not helpful and you do not have to accept them.

  9. You have the right to treasure your memories.
    Memories are one of the best legacies that exist after the death of someone loved. You will always remember. Instead, of ignoring your memories, find others with whom you can share them.

  10. You have the right to move toward your grief and heal.
    Reconciling your grief will not happen quickly. Remember, grief is a process, not an event. Be patient and tolerant with yourself and avoid ‘people who are impatient and intolerant with you. Neither you nor those around you must forget that the death of someone loved changes your life forever.

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“Mended Little Hearts allows parents to support each other and new families in a way that only another congenital heart defect family understands, giving families a sense of hope and security. When my son was finally home from the hospital, I was terrified, scared and depressed. When MLH came into my life, I finally felt a sense of security—knowing that I wasn't alone and other parents felt the same way I did.”
- Jaime Olsen, Mom to Tyler
Chicago, Illinois
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